7 Questions to Inspire Thinking and Ideas: ThingLink App

I had the opportunity to “lead” #1to1ipadchat,with Dena Gynn last week. Follow @Glynn_ed 

In preparation for the event, Dena advised me to write 6 questions to guide a discussion and provide examples. I did that and I also scheduled the timed released tweets through Tweet Deck. These tips from Dena helped tremendously.




I wondered if the prep would help me follow the conversation, since I’ll admit I have a 
difficult time keeping up with Twitter Chats. I did see my questions in the hashtag feed, but they were just there. I don’t think anyone responded, but I did notice some people retweeting them. Still, the answers and questions were hard to follow. We were all talking about other things, and that was a good thing too.

A New View of the Questions & Examples

To organize and share the questions and examples from the Twitter Chat I used a Google Form as a model for a content delivery method that works well with learners, young and old. This Google Form is designed to introduce ideas and provide the opportunity for feedback. 

If you please, you can view the questions and examples without actually responding to any of them. Click on the icon or link and you will be taken away from this blog to the Google form where all questions are optional and feedback is appreciated! 

The Form | Think | View Examples |Get Inspired |Connect 


Twitter – Powerful Bursts of Information

Twitter is a resource I often tap into. I am not a Twitter expert, nor do I utilize Twitter to it’s greatest potential, but it is certainly one of my go to tools when I’m looking to share and learn from the ideas of others. 

Many people don’t understand how Twitter can work efficiently. Many people don’t think they have time for Twitter.  Perhaps they don’t. We all have different learning styles and preferred methods of information gathering. We must all choose the tools that work for us and Twitter is in my toolkit because it works well for me as an efficient and effective tool for collaboration!


Twitter has allowed me to connect with many amazing, talented and connected #EdTech stakeholders across the planet. Twitter is efficient. Words are well chosen, the language is constantly reinvented, and of course links to resources are the treasures.

I recently had a quick Twitter conversation with Naomi Harm, a talented innovative educator and EdTech consultant from Minnesota.  Naomi and I have never met face to face, but we are certainly connected. We learn from each other, we share each other’s resources and ideas, and we collaborate quickly and efficiently. I’ve known Naomi to be an iPad expert for many years and since I have just jumped in to the iPad journey in my school, I grabbed the opportunity to ask Naomi for her for guidance. 

Here is our 15 minutes conversation, filled with treasures. Ah, yes…the things I can do with this information! Thanks Naomi. Keep on Tweeting!


Hello Naomi. Can you share your best iPad advice in 140 char or less? iPads are coming my way and I value your expertise.
Hi dear friend! Utilize the iPads as collaborative literacy tools & creative stations 4 students need to be co-creators/publishers
iPad literacy tools to empower student learning and creative/critical thinking/publishing: Book Creator, Skitch, Write About This
iPad literacy tools 2 empower student learning and creative/critical thinking/publishing: Primary Writer, Max Journal, Group Maker
Tap into the app repository of Appitic iPad Lessons for brillant ideas. Take care!
Thx for advice Perhaps a mantra: iPad literacy tools 2 empower student learning creativity and critical thinking. Amazing resources!


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Top 10 Tech Tools: An Interactive Graphic

With so many free and user friendly tech tools available for teachers, it’s hard to know where to begin to put together a list of the best tools for teaching and learning so I decided to take a look at my own resources to determine which tools I use the most. Rather than posting another running list of tools, features and uses, I decided to present the information visually, through an interactive ThingLink graphic. I used the new colored nubbins available to make it easier for visitors to explore areas of interest more efficiently. 




Scroll over the image and click on the colored nubbins to explore this intertwined collection of resources. As you explore the graphic please consider contributing your own content to share examples of ways to use these tools in education.


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Cast your vote for the Top 100 Tools for Learning 2012 on the Learning in the Social Workplace blog, by Jane Hart.